Dion Tatow

Dion Tatow is an Iman and Wadja man from Central Queensland and South Sea Islander (Ambrym Island, Vanuatu).   Dion is currently Regional Practice Leader with the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak (QATSICPP).   

Prior to joining QATSICPP in 2017, Dion worked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health for 20 years for both the Commonwealth and State Governments and the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council.  His roles focused on addressing social and emotional wellbeing/mental health and sexual health/blood borne viruses.  He played a key role in the development, implementation and evaluation of the “Lighting the Dark, Preventing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide” initiative in Queensland in 2014-2015.

Dion has been involved with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community based organisations since the early 1980s.  He has been a committee member for the gar’ban’djee’lum network since 2010 and is the current chairperson.  gar’ban’djee’lum is a Brisbane-based, independent social network which provides a peer based, culturally supportive safe space and place of belonging for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, Sistergirls and Brotherboys. The name gar’ban’djee’lum was given to the group by elders from the Butchulla and Gubbi Gubbi people and means ‘Us Mob’. 

gar’ban’djee’lum members come together to support each other, build new friendships, advocate for and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, Sistergirl and Brotherboy social issues, promote healthy lifestyles and celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, sexuality and gender identities.

gar’ban’djee’lum has partnered with IndigiLez Women’s Leadership and Support Group to develop and implement a suicide prevention community awareness campaign for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (including LGBTIQ+ Sistergirls and Brotherboys) within the Brisbane North region as part of the National Suicide Prevention Trial.  The community awareness campaign is part of a systems-based approach to suicide prevention and will be implemented alongside other areas of activity, including improving follow up care and high quality treatment, improving mental health and resilience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and training Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander frontline staff and community ‘connectors’.